Our Goal: The Inn

We are traveling the Pan American Highway partly for the adventure of travel but ultimately, the purpose of our trip is to find a place to settle. Our “forever home”.

In this “forever home”, we will build an Inn. The Inn will have more than one function. It will be a regular Inn for tourists to stay, but it will also:

 

  • be staffed by people with disabilities
  • be fully accessible
  • provide training for local people with disabilities to work at the Inn – and then graduate to work elsewhere

We see the Inn as also offering other types of training for people with disabilities:

 

  • bicycle and wheelchair repair and building
  • art practice
  • dance/theatre
  • guiding tours
  • language (English, Spanish, sign, etc)
  • gardening/farming
  • cooking
  • animal husbandry (- “farm to table” )

This is pretty broad. We think that because of the breadth of what will be going on, it will naturally turn into something of an intentional community.

As we slowly travel along the Pan American Highway, we are touching base with people, communities, and industry. We want to build this Inn where it will be needed and where it will succeed.

We think it should be in a place in which:

 

  • tourists will want to visit
  • has an existing tourist industry
  • has few employment opportunities for people with disabilities
  • is fairly easy to get to
  • is inexpensive
  • has a friendly local community that wants something like this to be built, and want to participate
  • has arable land

We will stop when we find the right place. We might need to go all the way to Argentina and take stock from there – but we feel we can find the right place to set it up somewhere along the Pan American Highway.

If you have ideas, advice, contacts – especially contacts with local disabled communities – we would love to hear them. If you want to be part of this, stay tuned and in touch. If you want to support it, please consider subscribing.

Thanks for cheering us on – it really means so much.

 

 

 

 

4 Comments

  1. Hello! I am twenty-nine weeks pregnant with a baby boy named Billy. We found out through a blood test at twelve weeks pregnant that he has Down Syndrome. I have taught children with Down Syndrome as an Early Intervention Teacher. My husband’s mother worked as a Teacher for Persons with Special Needs for thirty-five years so we both feel emotionally prepared. However, this is still a very new experience for us because we will be brand new parents in out forties.

    I have a wonderful support system where I live. Our friends and family have all rallied around us in a most amazing way. We get so busy with our lives that we forget how wonderful our friends and family really are!

    However, there is a limited amount of career options for people with Down Syndrome in our small farming community. There is a local business that helps people with disabilities work at fairly boring jobs like sorting recycled bottles, or packing boxes. My problem is that I don’t want our son to be placed into these jobs if that is not what he wants to do with his life. I’m hoping that he will be able to learn to communicate with us so that he can tell us what he wants to do. I don’t think anyone should have to work at a job that they don’t enjoy on a daily basis. Because of this, I would love to learn more about your Inn when you find the right place someday.

    You and your family are very inspiring for this new middle-aged mom!

    • WOW!
      Your message really blew me away. 29 weeks pregnant and so much is in place – and what an adventure for you both, with being new parents!

      We also live in a small farming community. There is a man with Down syndrome who lives here – he’s my age in fact – and he is the school custodian, works with the local camp and also the farmers market. He’s very busy and an integral part of the community. I think small farming communities might ultimately offer more than a larger community would because of how close knit it is – everyone knowing everyone – and accepting him, rather than just be aware of him or tolerating him – you know what I mean?

      I am sure your son will tell you what he needs and wants, and WOW! I’d love to stay in touch with you and follow your story. xoxox Lots of love your way.

      • Thank you for replying to my message so quickly! I agree that a small farming community can be a very nice place for a child with Down Syndrome to grow up in. I think my concerns come from when I worked as a service coordinator for persons with disabilities for a couple of years. I remember going to meetings and the “professionals” would all have their opinions about what the person that I advocated for should be doing as a career option. These “professionals” would spend a lot of energy trying to convince the person that they had their best interest at heart. However, certain programs would be pushed onto the person because these programs were more easily available. I want our son to be given options so that he can enjoy his life. As far as the community I live in, I love the people that live here! They are so supportive that I can’t imagine not having these people in my life!

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