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Hey! We’re back!

First, THE BOOK. We have about 6 people who said they are in (and I’ll be emailing everyone this week to get started).

Now, if you have a post or two that you’d like to see in the book compilation, that’s fine. If you have the whole series that you’d like to see in the book compilation, that’s fine. There is no limit or restrictions. Personally, I care far more about quality over quantity.

So, if you want to participate or have questions that you need answered before you can, just contact me using the form right here:

 thankyouthankyouthankyou

On to the Series!

A quick recap: 

Week One: My Connection with Disability

Week Two: Coming to Terms with Disability

Week Three: A Letter to My Younger Self

Week Four: Talking Raw, Talking Real: Challenges Related to Disability

Week Five: Connections and Comforts

Week Six: VENT! – what pisses you off

* all links are still open if you’d like to participate  *

This week:  

Golden Moments

right-click save this image if you would like to use it with your own post/hop
right-click save this image if you would like to use it with your own post/hop

Golden Moments: the pure joy moments, the moments with unicorns and glitter, or the moments that time just stands still as you look at your child and see their beauty shining. Moments that make you grateful to be alive, moments that you treasure and hold dear.

Is it the old man who reached forth and touched your child’s hair, smiling, and said, “never worry about her; God takes care of His own”, is it the feeling that makes you burst inside when you see your child included and accepted? Or is it YOU, is it how you feel when you make friends with someone with your same disability, someone who *gets* it on every level? Or is it
“golden” as in, “funny”, like the time you were making out and your hearing aids went off on wild feedback and the guy was trying to figure out what the sound was and you didn’t hear it (and even if you did you wouldn’t have done anything since you were trying to pass as non-deaf…) and it turned into this completely hilarious moment?

Golden Moments. Tell us yours. However you want to interpret it. However you want to write about it. Tell it to us.

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The writing prompt is optional:

If you’d rather just post the link to another post you’ve written, that’s fine. You do not need to follow the prompt!



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– coming weeks – links not up yet:

Week 8: How A Connection with Disability Has Changed How I See the World

Week 9: A Challenge: Present a Post in a Way You Don’t Usually – write a poem, post photographs or a painting your made…something that stretches you

Week 10: What I Will Fight For

Week 11: My Vision of a Perfectly Accessible World Looks Like This

Week 12: Disabled and Proud, And Here’s Why

Week 13: Celebrate! Pieces I Love

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download (1)Judy Heumann

…is an attractive woman, perhaps a smidgen above middle-aged. An aura of authority and intelligence is around her, her voice is crisp, clear, firm. She is a strong woman and it shows.

judy heumannShe is also one of the early leaders of the disability rights movement. She affected change on a level that grew to be global – this solitary woman who uses a wheelchair, this teacher who wouldn’t quit. She drove “access” clear on through until it has become a common word.

L-R: Ed Roberts, Judy Heumann and Joan Leon from the World Institute on Disability
L-R: Ed Roberts, Judy Heumann and Joan Leon from the World Institute on Disability

Judy Heumann is an amazing woman, a remarkable woman, a mighty woman.

justindart4

And when I went to hear her speak some years ago at UC Berkeley, I could not stop crying.

I just couldn’t.

I was trying, God knows I was. I was pinching my legs, trying so hard to keep it under wraps because I wanted to make a good impression, I wanted to be awesome and… I couldn’t stop crying.

This is why:

Because Judy Heumann gets this struggle, the whole entire struggle of disability and the disability rights movement on the deepest level that is possible. She gets it. She knows what discrimination is like, what it feels like, how it weasels its way through to your marrow and explodes like a burning cancer. She knows how it is to have people say, “no”, say you are a mistake, say you shouldn’t have been born, she knows how it feels to be outside looking in, uninvited or to have access denied on a regular basis as it’s just not convenient or because someone forgot  – yet  again. She knows these things, by sheer dint of her experience and her contact with so many others with disabilities, through her decades of advocacy and fighting for equal rights.

Surrounded in the room as I was with others who have a connection, with others who know what this is about, this life with disability, this double edged sword of unique experience and unique discrimination, unique life with unique oppression – I couldn’t keep it together. The relief in being with others who know, who get it, was simply overwhelming.

This I think is true no matter how you slice your cake.

If you are gay, if you a minority, if you are a parent of a child with a disability – whatever it is, point being; if you have struggled uphill, against the current, alone, carrying your canoe on your head, you almost faint with the delicious relief of being able to roll with the tide. Meeting people who understand what it’s all about can make inner delight just blow up and dissolve in dollops of rainbows from which dancing unicorns spring forth. I mean, IT DOES NOT GET BETTER THAN THAT. Because you have been alone for so long and tried so hard and cried so much and there were those times in which you just howled because you thought your heart was being ripped because you just couldn’t take this shit anymore.

People who get it: these are for me the comforts and connections of disability.

It’s the people like Judy Heumann, who fight so hard, who represent so much, who speak so clearly. It’s the people like the woman who I met at Kaiser, who had a tattoo of the 21st chromosome on her hand and I knew she was in my club, was a mother of a person with a little extra and got it. It’s the people who I met at NDSC who read this blog and smiled at us in the hallway, it’s the people who supported us in reaching for our dreams as we left the Bay Area for the Pan American Highway.

These are the comforts and connections.

These are the people who are walking with me and share for a while the carrying of the canoe – people who will hold my hand – and I, theirs – as we walk upriver against the current.

And hopefully one day, we will be successful in our re-routing of the river. We  will all be floating easily downstream, laughing together as we paddle our canoes with a current that supports us all.

river

 

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Hey! We’re back!

Moving forward with the 3rd Annual Summer Blogging Series with the optional prompts

A quick recap: 

Week One: My Connection with Disability

Week Two: Coming to Terms with Disability

Week Three: A Letter to My Younger Self

Week Four: Talking Raw, Talking Real: Challenges Related to Disability

* all links are still open if you’d like to participate  *

This week:  

Comforts & Connections

right-click-save if you'd like to use this image for your post
right-click-save if you’d like to use this image for your post

This is about the connections and comforts related to your experience with disability – is it the people you meet and know? Is it the wonderful silence that you get when you take out your hearing aids or cochlear implants? Is it how good it feels to fly fast in your wheelchair with the wind in your face? Is it how full your heart feels when you’ve been in the waiting room, waiting for your child’s open heart surgery and there is another mother of a child with a disability there, and she looks up at you and smiles and you know she knows how you feel, and her eyes fill with tears and you start to bawl?

These moments.

Let’s write about these moments!

***

The writing prompt is optional:

If you’d rather just post the link to another post you’ve written, that’s fine. You do not need to follow the prompt!



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– coming weeks – links not up yet:

Week 6: Vent: An Open Letter to Someone/Something Who Pisses You Off

Week 7: Golden Moments

Week 8: How A Connection with Disability Has Changed How I See the World

Week 9: A Challenge: Present a Post in a Way You Don’t Usually – write a poem, post photographs or a painting your made…something that stretches you

Week 10: What I Will Fight For

Week 11: My Vision of a Perfectly Accessible World Looks Like This

Week 12: Disabled and Proud, And Here’s Why

Week 13: Celebrate! Pieces I Love

*****

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 BLOG HOP WEEK THREE!

This week in the 3rd Annual Summer Blog Hop series aimed at creating community and sharing voices between the disability and disability-ally (- parents, friends, etc) segments in our shared tangerine of life.

About:

The Blog Hop is a space where you can drop the URL link to a post you have written either on your own blog or another site. It can be based on the optional writing prompts (- a list of which is linked here), or not.

The Hop is open for two weeks, which means you can drop your link at any point in that time.

The Writing Prompt

The writing prompts are optional, but if you follow them, they will carry us all through a narrative arc and we’ll be able to collect all of our posts at the end of summer and potentially publish them.

The prompt for this week is:

A Letter to My Younger Self

– reaching back in time, what would you say to a younger you? If you have a disability, would it be something along the lines of what to expect in life? How things work out? If you don’t have a disability, would it be talking to the you from the moment you received the news that your child has a disability? The you that perhaps felt a great deal of sadness, that wanted to run away or drive off a cliff?

What would you say to yourself, knowing what you do now?

meriah nichols summer blogging series
right-click-save if you want to post this on your blog

 

Code:

You are welcome to copy the code at the end of the hop and host this yourself!

Okay, let’s boogie –


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Subscribe via email by just adding your email address here –

 


 

Summer Blog Hop Series: CHALLENGE!

This is our third Summer Blog Hop Series and there are three ways to participate:

  1. Follow the OPTIONAL narrative arc by following the writing prompts (which are listed  HERE ). Re-working older posts that you have written or just posting the links to those URL’s is an awesome way for some of us to follow the prompts. Or write new posts.
  2. Write and post what you want without following the writing prompts
  3. You can also participate just by reading and sharing the posts!

Notes:

  • The links for each week will remain open for two weeks.
  • You are free to copy and paste the code to host the blog hop yourself!
  • EVERYONE IS WELCOME

Ready?

So this week, the prompt is:

Coming to Terms with Disability in My Life

–  a post about coming to terms with disability in your life (be it as a parent, a person with a disability, etc) – this can be taken in whatever direction you want – as light or as in-depth as you feel like writing about.

Let’s go! (FAQ below the link)



 

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 FAQ’s:

 What is a Blog Hop?

A Blog Hop is like a party for blog posts: we set up a space and bloggers come and add the direct URL links to the posts that they have written. Then they get a chance to meet other bloggers by way of visiting the other posts in the Hop

 How do I join?

You join by adding the direct URL link of a post that you want to include in the Hop.

 What if I don’t want to follow the prompt?

That’s fine. Add the link to another post, even if it isn’t the prompt.

 Do I have to do weird link code things?

Nope! All you have to do is drop the link to your post if that’s all you want to do. If you want to do more, you have the option to code the code and add it to your blog so that you yourself are also hosting the Hop. Up to you!

I just started blogging… can I do this?

YES!!!

I blog in a language other than English… is that okay?

Sure – can you add a feature to your blog to translate it to a language we understand? It would be really cool to read more cross-cultural perspectives – thank you for joining

 I don’t feel like writing new posts but I want to join…

How about re-working an older post? Take a blog post you have published on your blog already, look at it with fresh eyes and re-write pieces of it. Then re-publish it.

any other questions? Email me:

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– grab the badge – right/click save!

meriah nichols summer series blog hop

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Don’t miss out on the blog hops, posts and more! Sign up now


 

Summer Blog Hop Series: CHALLENGE!

This is our third Summer Blog Hop Series, and I want to kick this up a notch. How about it?!

Let’s try and follow a story arc. Let’s try and write our way through the whole arc of our connection with disability, and then let’s gather the posts at the end of the summer series and publish them in a book!

Sound good? Ambitious enough?!

I’m going to include the entire collection of prompts HERE – please make suggestions or tweaks – so that we have time to write the posts in advance or find old posts and re-work the old posts (a practice I highly recommend!)

The links for each week will remain open for two weeks.

You are free to copy and paste the code to host the blog hop yourself!

EVERYONE IS WELCOME

Ready?

So this week, the prompt is:

My Connection with Disability: An Introduction

–  a post about your connection with disability (be it as a parent, a person with a disability, etc)

Let’s go! (FAQ below the link)



 

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 FAQ’s:

 What is a Blog Hop?

A Blog Hop is like a party for blog posts: we set up a space and bloggers come and add the direct URL links to the posts that they have written. Then they get a chance to meet other bloggers by way of visiting the other posts in the Hop

 How do I join?

You join by adding the direct URL link of a post that you want to include in the Hop.

 What if I don’t want to follow the prompt?

That’s fine. Add the link to another post, even if it isn’t the prompt.

 Do I have to do weird link code things?

Nope! All you have to do is drop the link to your post if that’s all you want to do. If you want to do more, you have the option to code the code and add it to your blog so that you yourself are also hosting the Hop. Up to you!

I just started blogging… can I do this?

YES!!!

I blog in a language other than English… is that okay?

Sure – can you add a feature to your blog to translate it to a language we understand? It would be really cool to read more cross-cultural perspectives – thank you for joining

 I don’t feel like writing new posts but I want to join…

How about re-working an older post? Take a blog post you have published on your blog already, look at it with fresh eyes and re-write pieces of it. Then re-publish it.

any other questions? Email me:

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grab the badge!

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Don’t miss out on the blog hops, posts and more! Sign up now


 

This monthly blog hop is a community project. The code is set up so that everyone can participate by adding their link to their post – and host if they want, by adding the code to their own post! So, just follow the instructions through the linky tool (below).

(3):

One truth (about Down syndrome/our lives with Down syndrome OR DISABILITY)

One tip (- information on something related to Ds/Disability/raising a child with Ds/Disability or just parenting in general)

One photo


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Right click save for the 3/21 image!

hop

This is part of the monthly Community Blog Hop, 3 on the 21st. A truth, a tip and a photo. Read more about it here. And join yourself!

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One truth:

Disability isn’t a big deal. Disability is a natural part of the human experience – it’s a chance and an opportunity to explore the world from new vantage points.

Societal attitudes about disability are a big deal. 

A huge deal. An enormous deal. A deal that can make you gasp and can break your heart.

Don’t let it. Just remember that WE are society; each one of us is who a society is made of.

We can change this, we *will* change this.

Each one teach one, we can do it!

 

One Tip:

This isn’t so much about straight-up parenting as it is about a resource: DREDF. That is, Disability Rights Education Defense Fund.

Need help with the IEP? With understanding IDEA? Go to them.

 

One Photo:

"Do It For Me"
“Do It For Me”

PS

Join the Blog Hop HERE

This monthly blog hop is a community project. The code is set up so that everyone can participate by adding their link to their post – and host if they want, by adding the code to their own post! So, just follow the instructions through the linky tool (below).

(3):

One truth (about Down syndrome/our lives with Down syndrome OR DISABILITY)

One tip (- information on something related to Ds/Disability/raising a child with Ds/Disability or just parenting in general)

One photo


Welcome to the Summer Disability Blog Hop on With a Little Moxie. This is a hop for bloggers who:
  • are disability advocates
  • people with disabilities 
  • anyone who has a connection with disability through blogging – even if it’s a one-time post for this Hop!
The point of the hop is to connect and share. Meet new people. Create community.
The Summer Series will go until the end of August. Each hop will remain “open” for two weeks – that is, you can join at any point in the given period by adding the direct URL to your post on the NON-OPTIONAL PROMPT.
The non-optional topic for the Hop running from July 18-August 1st is:

 

– For parents of children with disabilities: How have earlier interactions with individuals with Down syndrome – or other disabilities –  influence (d)  how you felt and feel about your child’s diagnosis?

– For people with disabilities: How have earlier interactions with individuals with disabilities influenced how you feel about your own diagnosis?

POSTING YOUR LINK:

  • click on “click here to enter” (below)
  • when it open in a new window, add the title of your blog and post title where it says “picture caption”. Add the direct URL link to your post where it says “link”.  Email address and name are optional.

After you placed your information, something comes up that asks you about if you want the code for the hop on your blog. If you do, just indicate yes, copy and paste the code. Once pasted, open your original post, view it in HTML, not the typical visual mode (there are two tabs next to both blogger and wordpress screen in which you can choose between HTML and visual). Scroll to the very bottom of your post, paste the code. Switch back to the visual to check and make sure it looks right. It should (unless you have free wordpress – the code isn’t the best for free wp; just for blogger and self-hosted wp).

PLEASE:

  • do link back to this post or to the another participating blog with the code – help introduce your regular readers to new blogs and voices. The point of this, after all, is connect and share. Meet new people. Create community.
  • do visit other blogs participating, leave comments and be supportive of new writers!

Any questions, just email me at withalittlemoxie@gmail.com.

THE HOP WILL OFFICIALLY BE LIVE FROM THE 18TH

PS. Thanks to Melissa Kline Skavlem for the topic this week. If you have an idea for the final topic, please email me.

Welcome to the Summer Disability Blog Hop on With a Little Moxie – this is a hop for bloggers who are advocates, people with disabilities and/or have a connection with disability through blogging.

 

The point of the hop is to connect and share. Meet new people. Create community.
The Summer Series will go until the end of August. Each Hop will remain “open” for two weeks – that is, you can join at any point in the given period by adding the direct url to your post on the NON-OPTIONAL prompt.
The topic for the Hop running from July 5- July 19 is:

That is: Faith and Disability. How has your faith (or lack of) influenced the framework within which you view/experience disability? How has that “Faith Lens” (or lack of) affected your perspective?

If you’d like to play with the photo of Spock, here it is

Spock-riffing is totally optional. Again, the prompt is not.

(to riff the photo – just upload it over at picmonkey, add comic bubbles, save to your computer, then upload to your post! Easy peas)

POSTING YOUR LINK:

– click on “click here to enter”

– when it open in a new window, add the title of your blog and post title where it says “picture caption”. Add the direct url link to your post where it says “link”.  Email address and name are optional.

After you placed your information, something comes up that asks you about if you want the code for the hop on your blog. If you do, just indicate yes, copy and paste the code. Once pasted, open your original post, view it in HTML, not the typical visual mode (there are two tabs next to both blogger and wordpress screen in which you can choose between HTML and visual). Scroll to the very bottom of your post, paste the code. Switch back to the visual to check and make sure it looks right. It should (unless you have free wordpress – the code isn’t the best for free wp; just for blogger and self-hosted wp).

Any questions, just email me at withalittlemoxie@gmail.com.

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Welcome to the Summer Disability Blog Hop on With a Little Moxie – this is a hop for bloggers who are advocates, people with disabilities and/or have a connection with disability through blogging. That includes Down syndrome bloggers, Deaf bloggers, blind bloggers, bloggers without a disability but who have a loved one with a disability. Bloggers with all and every type of physical/mental disability. It also includes bloggers who don't blog on disability/special needs but would like to write or include a post that has a disability connection.
 
 
If I missed you in this description, holla but the point I hope has been made: the spectrum of disability is huge and this hop is for everyone.
 
 
The point of the hop is to connect and share. Meet new people. Create community.
 
 
The optional prompt for this week is was posted on Monday – it's:  
SAY CHEESE! Let's have some photos – just post some fun pictures that have a connection with disability – your child with Down syndrome/special needs, yourself and your bad-ass chair, your hearing/seeing dog. What-have-you, but let's have us some FUN.
 
 
Since the spectrum for disability (and our representation within) is so broad, this prompt is open to absolutely any way you'd like to interpret it – or not. You don't have to use it.
 
 
Star Trek Photo Prompt + Photo to Riff is here.

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I'll go first –

my daughter – who has Down syndrome
"happy all the time", right?!
and me. I'm deaf.
…a deaf Trekkie and that's why my kids like Star Trek too
 

Live Long and Prosper and I can't wait to see your pics! (that is, if you want to go with the prompt)

(hop links open for a week).
Ready, set – your turn!

Welcome to the Deaf/Disability/Special Needs Summer Blog Hop Series!

This series will be running until the end of August. There is an (entirely optional) prompt posted each Wednesday along with a (highly optional) photo to play with and riff off. You are more than welcome to post anything that is deaf/disability/special needs related from a past post on your blog – the only “rule” is that it must be deaf/disability/special needs related (you yourself do not need to be a “disability/special needs” blogger; just your post needs to be relevant).

** the links are open for a week – this week’s will close next Tuesday, June 19th. Plenty of time to post something new or original **

This week’s optional prompt was suggested by Melissa Stoltz:


That is, What is your take on therapy or Early Intervention from birth to 3 years old? In adapting that question, please bend it to suit your perspective – for example, what is your take on speech therapy for the deaf? Or what is your take on “special needs” therapy groups for really little kids?

And if you want to post a link to something completely different, that’s fine too. It’s all good,within the deaf/disability/special needs writing realm.

The blank photo for you to have some fun with:

* to use it, just open to a new window and right-click save. Upload to picmonkey and add comic bubble, fill it in with text, VOILA!, repost on your blog and post the direct link to your post below.

  • If you’d like to suggest a prompt, please email or leave a comment.
  • For more on what a Blog Hop is – go here
  • To read the past couple of hops, go here

Ready…set… LET’S HOP!

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This is in connection to the BlogHop prompt for this week: What have people said that has gotten under your skin about something that relates to your connection with disability – and what do you want them to say instead?

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I was 11 years old in Healdsburg, California. On the swings next to a boy named Blue (who I had a huge crush on). I was waiting for my guardian to pick me up from school, he was also waiting for his ride. My leg was in a long cast, having broken it a month previously. My thick, coke bottle glasses with their classically 80’s frames (clear, swooping, you know the kind I’m talking about) framed my big eyes. My medically-beige hearing aids encapsulated both of my ears. My hair hung limply over my facial scars.


Blue said something. My heart beat faster – he talked to me! he said something to me! – I couldn’t hear him and so I asked “hmm? what did you say?”


He rocked a little on the swing. Hands clasping the chain links. “I said, you can’t hear, you can’t see and you can’t even walk now. What can you do? I mean, everything is so wrong with you.”


My parents had sent me away from Fiji (where they were, along with my brother). That heart hurt along with the liberal lacing of pubescent angst and disability-related insecurities wove a neat little arrow that Blue shot rather deftly into my young heart. 


What could I do? I mean really. When everything was so wrong with me?


Something being “wrong” with me haunted me for years. And years. I suppose that is the answer to the question – I wish that people wouldn’t think there is something wrong with disability. That it’s something to fix. That we are broken bits of human flesh or something. 


I’d rather instead that disability was viewed as a chance to see the world from a unique perspective. Not “unique” in that horrifically condescending “special” kind of unique, but “unique” in the utterly glorious way that all humans are capable of offering. 

Rather than seeing me as a tall, awkward freckle-faced girl who is a hair away from being legally blind, who is deaf with facial scars and brain injury (and a broken leg!), I wish Blue had just kept his hands on the links of his swing, swung in peace, swung in silence and simply remembered that I got that broken leg while beating him at broad-jumping.



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Onto the BlogHop:
Please add your link to the post you’d like to share: either for the optional prompt, of the photo-to-riff or of another topic or past post you liked.

It’s all good and welcome, so long as it relates to disability/special needs.



This is in connection to the BlogHop prompt for this week: What have people said that has gotten under your skin about something that relates to your connection with disability – and what do you want them to say instead?

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I was 11 years old in Healdsburg, California. On the swings next to a boy named Blue (who I had a huge crush on). I was waiting for my guardian to pick me up from school, he was also waiting for his ride. My leg was in a long cast, having broken it a month previously. My thick, coke bottle glasses with their classically 80’s frames (clear, swooping, you know the kind I’m talking about) framed my big eyes. My medically-beige hearing aids encapsulated both of my ears. My hair hung limply over my facial scars.


Blue said something. My heart beat faster – he talked to me! he said something to me! – I couldn’t hear him and so I asked “hmm? what did you say?”


He rocked a little on the swing. Hands clasping the chain links. “I said, you can’t hear, you can’t see and you can’t even walk now. What can you do? I mean, everything is so wrong with you.”


My parents had sent me away from Fiji (where they were, along with my brother). That heart hurt along with the liberal lacing of pubescent angst and disability-related insecurities wove a neat little arrow that Blue shot rather deftly into my young heart. 


What could I do? I mean really. When everything was so wrong with me?


Something being “wrong” with me haunted me for years. And years. I suppose that is the answer to the question – I wish that people wouldn’t think there is something wrong with disability. That it’s something to fix. That we are broken bits of human flesh or something. 


I’d rather instead that disability was viewed as a chance to see the world from a unique perspective. Not “unique” in that horrifically condescending “special” kind of unique, but “unique” in the utterly glorious way that all humans are capable of offering. 

Rather than seeing me as a tall, awkward freckle-faced girl who is a hair away from being legally blind, who is deaf with facial scars and brain injury (and a broken leg!), I wish Blue had just kept his hands on the links of his swing, swung in peace, swung in silence and simply remembered that I got that broken leg while beating him at broad-jumping.



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Onto the BlogHop:
Please add your link to the post you’d like to share: either for the optional prompt, of the photo-to-riff or of another topic or past post you liked.

It’s all good and welcome, so long as it relates to disability/special needs.



It's Monday and that means it's the day for the (completely optional) prompt as well as a quick refresher on the whole Blog Hop thing.

 

What is a blog hop: click here.

The point of the Wednesday Hop:
The point is to gather Down syndrome and Disability/Special Needs bloggers under one umbrella. Each Monday I'll post an optional prompt – a subject/question or idea that you are free to not follow. This is just for those of you that like a little nudging. You are more than welcome to just post a "regular" post, a "slice of life" describing bits/pieces of your day-to-day. It can be anything, really – just keep it on the overall disability/special needs theme (so save your How to Repair a Transmission post for Thursday).

 

Because this is NOT just for parent-bloggers of kids with Down syndrome and it IS also for general Disability bloggers (both people with a disability and also advocates and parents), the prompts are going to be pretty general. You can interpret them as you'd like and as it relates to you and your life.

 

All Hops will be kept under the new "Hop Page" in the tabs so you'll have a place to look through back posts and read past weeks that you may have missed.

Sound good?

All right! Let's get cracking.

This week, the optional prompt is is:

That is, "Down's kid?" – the question being in essence:  
what have people said that has gotten under your skin about something that relates to your connection with disability – and what do you want them to say instead?

and the blank photo in case you want to mess with is:

* to use it, just open to a new window and right-click save. Upload to picmonkey and add comic bubble, fill it in with text, VOILA!, repost on the Wednesday Hop.

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Welcome to the first-ever Disability Blog Hop on With a Little Moxie – this is a hop for bloggers who are advocates, people with disabilities and/or have a connection with disability through blogging. That includes Down syndrome bloggers, Deaf bloggers, blind bloggers, bloggers without a disability but who have a loved one with a disability. Bloggers with all and every type of physical/mental disability. If I missed you in this description, holla but the point I hope has been made: the spectrum of disability is huge and this hop is for everyone.

The point of the hop is to connect and share. Meet new people. Create community.

The optional prompt for this week:

– tell me more about your connection with disability.

Since the spectrum for disability (and our representation within) is so broad, this prompt is open to absolutely any way you'd like to interpret it – or not. You don't have to use it.

Blank photo of Captain Kirk if you want to spoof and riff:

(one way to create a talk bubble – just open the photo in a new window, right-click save; upload to picmonkey and open the "comic bubble" piece – add what you want, save and re-upload. Easy peas, right?)

Now, let's have some fun. Just add the link you'd like to include for this hop, then have fun browsing the other links.



PS
New prompt for next week will be up on Monday. If you'd like me to email it to you, send me an email letting me know – I'd be glad to remind anyone that wants it.

PSS
In the "linky" link, it has a big box for a "photo description" – in there, please include your blog name, your name, and the title of the post you are featuring if possible. Still ironing out kinks!

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