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This post on the best stroller for a child with Down syndrome is NOT sponsored but there are affiliate links in it. I’m not writing this post as an ad; I’m writing it because I really do want newer parents to know this is the best rugged, long-term, high-weight-capacity stroller out there.

The Best Stroller for a Child with a Disability

The best stroller for a child with a disability is obviously going to need to be a fit for the child’s disability. For the purpose of this post, by “disability” I simply mean, “a disability that necessitates using a stroller for a longer period of time than is customary for comparative ages.” That may cover Down syndrome, autism, cerebral palsy and so forth.

My Story:

When I was pregnant with my daughter with Down syndrome, I  went to a park to meet a mom of a child with Down syndrome, and the child herself. They were lovely people.

The child bolted – it was the first time I saw bolting in action – and I admit I thought the mom was over-reacting at the time (little did I know how bolting would later shape my own life…). After the mom had raced and caught up with the child, the child was plunked in a stroller and strapped in. The child was 7 years old.

At the time, I understood plunking the child in the stroller, but I did not understand bolting. I also clearly remember thinking that stroller – a McLaren umbrella type – was too small for the little girl – she looked squished in it.

Fast Forward 7 Years

My own daughter is 7 years old now, and she bolts. She also ‘flops and drops’ occasionally.

I  travel a lot with my kids, and get out, go. There is not a weekend that goes by in which we don’t go someplace, be it the beach, forest, river or just long walks down fun trails.

The Best Stroller for a Child with Down Syndrome

Given that my daughter with Down syndrome bolts, flops n’ drops and is not ready to ride a bike, I knew I needed a stroller with a lot of room to grow into, a high weight capacity, and rugged durability to satisfy both the exigencies of Ds and my own personal ‘get out and go’ needs. The BOB Revolution is the only stroller that I have found to satisfy both needs.

BOB Revolution Pro Duallie Stroller and Disability

We had the BOB Revolution initially with my (typically developing) firstborn. My (then) husband was a bicycle mechanic and the BOB was something that his bike shop sold. We got it at cost.

Now, the fact that bike shops sell the BOB says a lot about the BOB. It’s built like a rugged mountain bike, with the suspension, shock absorbers, etc. You can use bike tires with it, no problem. We used that stroller for SEVEN YEARS – in the end, it died after we were hauling it around Angkor Wat in Cambodia with all 3 kids on it.

I turned to the BOB double, which is called the “duallie”.

The BOB Revolution Pro Duallie Stroller is like a steroid on wheels. My two youngest plopped right in – Moxie, who has Down syndrome, age 8 and Mack, who is typically developing, age 5. The stroller doesn’t blink; their weight is nothing, and I can easily use it for some time.

Other Strollers for a Child with a Disability

Other strollers will work of course. I’m not trying to say that the BOB is the only one out there!

I had a  for a while and really loved it while traveling in urban areas, New York City in particular.

For 2 kids, that thing was awesome (moveable seats! a single streamlined carriage! huge underbelly for storing stuff! folds flat!). But the kids outgrew it pretty quickly – the seats are much smaller and can’t handle as much weight.

Why I Will Only Recommend the BOB Revolution for another Parent of a Child with a Disability:

Strollers are hella expensive these days. A good one is Pricey (yes, with a capital “P”). When you get a stroller, you want to make sure it will last a long time, especially if you have a child with a disability and know you will likely need it longer than you might if your child didn’t have the disability. It’s an investment.

The Best Stroller for a Child with Down SyndromeSince the stroller is really an investment, put it on your shower list or office/church/friend registry so others can help chip in, and make sure the stroller you get will be something that can actually carry your child comfortably past 8 years of age. I have not actually seen any stroller except the BOB Revolution capable of doing that, and I myself only own a duallie now.

 

Some things to note:

  • The single BOB is more sturdy than the double. But that does not mean that the double isn’t sturdy; basically, it means that the single is a tank and the double is a jeep.
  • It costs a lot. You have to buy the snack trays and your own drink holder separately. If you get this when you are about to have your second/third child, you can put the baby in it AND the toddler and they will continue to use the stroller until they are both well past 5 years old. I fooled around with lower-cost options and ended up regretting it. I should have just bought this one (more expensive but far superior) stroller to begin with.
  • It’s wide, but NO WIDER THAN A WHEELCHAIR. So if it’s a hassle getting it in somewhere, you don’t need to apologize; all pathways in the US should be able to accommodate it by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and if they are not, then they should. No excuses; this is almost 2020, for crying out loud.
  • It folds close down and locks; the hand brake is good; the foot brake is the one I usually use myself.
  • Make sure you get the Flex or Pro because the Jogger’s wheel does not turn.

The Duallie is a tool that you will totally think is worth it’s weight in gold when you encounter bolting issues – or flop and drops – with your child with Down syndrome (great post from Confessions of the Chromosally Enhanced linked here). It will last you for years, and years of hard wear and abuse.

It’s a worthy stroller.

(and believe it or not, this was NOT a sponsored post!!)


Buy the BOB Single Pro or BOB Revolution Pro Duallie (Pro is better because the sunshades are longer and the wheel is not locked so it can really go ANYWHERE)

Bob Revolution Duallie onAmazon

REI sells the BOB too (if you are a member, this is a great option because of the co-op membership cash back)

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This post on the best stroller for a child with Down syndrome is NOT sponsored but there are affiliate links in it. I’m not writing this post as an ad; I’m writing it because I really do want newer parents to know this is the best rugged, long-term, high-weight-capacity stroller out there.

When I was pregnant with Moxie, we went to a park to meet a mom of a child with Down syndrome, and the child herself. They were lovely people.

The child bolted – it was the first time I saw bolting in action – and I admit I thought the mom was over-reacting at the time (little did I know…). After the mom had raced and caught up with the child, the child was plunked in a stroller and strapped in. The child was 7 years old.

At the time, I understood plunking the child in the stroller, but I did not understand bolting. I also clearly remember thinking that stroller – an McLaren umbrella type – was too small for the little girl – she looked squished in it.

Fast Forward 7 Years

My own daughter is 7 years old now, and bolts occasionally. She also ‘flops and drops’ occasionally.

I also travel a lot with my kids, and get out, go. There is not a weekend that goes by in which we don’t go someplace, be it the beach, forest, river or just long walks down fun trails.

The Best Stroller for a Child with Down Syndrome

Given that my daughter with Down syndrome bolts, flops n’ drops and is not ready to ride a bike, I knew I needed a stroller with a lot of room to grow into, a high weight capacity, and rugged durability to satisfy both the exigencies of Ds and my own personal ‘get out and go’ needs. The BOB Revolution is the only stroller that I have found to satisfy both needs.

BOB Revolution Pro Duallie Stroller

The BOB Revolution Pro Duallie Stroller is like a steroid on wheels. I put my two youngest children in it (Moxie, who has Down syndrome, age 7 and Mack, who is typically developing, age 5), and zoom off.

I had a Baby Jogger City Select Double Stroller for a while and really loved it while traveling in urban areas, New York City in particular. For 2 kids, that thing was awesome (moveable seats! a single streamlined carriage! huge underbelly for storing stuff! folds flat!). But the kids outgrew it pretty quickly – the seats are much smaller and can’t handle as much weight.

I turned back to the BOB Revolution, which I had used from the time my first-born (Micah) was born through till we travelled in Cambodia and it finally couldn’t take it anymore.

This time, I bought a Duallie, which can easily handle way more than 50 lbs PER SEAT with plenty of butt and leg room for the kids.

It’s not cheap. But it’s crazy-hella sturdy and lets me take the kids virtually anywhere: I can roll with it and let them walk (with strict rules for holding on to the stroller as they do so), then plunk them in when they’ve had enough. Micah rides his bike alongside me (I’m a fast walker).

The Best Stroller for a Child with Down SyndromeMy advice for any parent who really likes to get out and GO, and who has two little kids who are either kind of close in age or twins, GET THE DUALLIE. With the excellent build, the craftsmanship, the weight capacity, the bike tires and room for growth, you will be able to use it for a long, long, lonnnnnnnng time.

It even checks at the gate of an airplane (yes, really), so you can bring it with you when you travel by plane.

Some things to note:

  • The single BOB is more sturdy than the double. But that does not mean that the double isn’t sturdy; basically, it means that the single is a tank and the double is a jeep.
  • It costs a lot. You have to buy the snack trays and your own drink holder separately. If you get this when you are about to have your second/third child, you can put the baby in it AND the toddler and they will continue to use the stroller until they are both well past 5 years old. I fooled around with lower-cost options and ended up regretting it. I should have just bought this one (more expensive but far superior) stroller to begin with.
  • It’s wide, but NO WIDER THAN A WHEELCHAIR. So if it’s a hassle getting it in somewhere, you don’t need to apologize; all pathways in the US should be able to accommodate it by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and if they are not, then they should. No excuses; this is almost 2020, for crying out loud.
  • It folds close down and locks; the hand brake is good; the foot brake is the one I usually use myself.
  • Make sure you get the Flex or Pro because the Jogger’s wheel does not turn.

The Duallie is a tool that you will totally think is worth it’s weight in gold when you encounter bolting issues – or flop and drops – with your child with Down syndrome (great post from Confessions of the Chromosally Enhanced linked here). It will last you for years, and years of hard wear and abuse. It’s a worthy stroller.

Buy the BOB Single Pro or BOB Duallie Pro (Pro is better because the covers are longer and it’s a tad more flexible):

Bob Revolution Duallie on Amazon

REI sells the BOB too (if you are a member, this is a great option because of the co-op membership cash back)

Waterproof hearing aids are a big deal.

I mean, huge. HUGE! I don’t think you are actually likely to understand unless you actually use hear-wear. It’s enormous.

Just to kind of give you a glimpse, though, think about all the times in which water is around you: the shower, the pool, hot tubs, hot springs, ocean, rivers, RAIN? Maybe it’s a bigger deal for me than for someone living in say, Kansas, since I’ve spent my entire life so far around the Pacific Ocean, but there is no denying that for any of us, all of us, water is a part of our lives.

Water is always in the back of my mind.

Someone turns on the sprinkler? DAMMIT! get that away from my hearing aids! Or the hose, or those sudden-dousing “fun” things? Boats, canoes, kayaks, all of that usually has me in anxiety.

My choice, you see, has always been to either participate in something that relates to water and take the chance of killing my super expensive piece of hear-ware OR participate with them off, rendering me unable to communicate, thanks to my lack of signing (parents; this is why you need to teach your kids ASL, okay?? so they are not stuck like I am now).

So I just about swooned when I saw that Siemens has a new TOTALLY WATERPROOF hearing aid out.

Siemens Aquaris: A Waterproof Hearing Aid

I know, for those of you who know hearing aids, this really does sound like an impossibility, doesn’t it? I mean, where does the battery casing go? The microphone? How can the microphone work if it’s encased? Doesn’t make sense. But I was so excited about the possibility, I went for it anyway.

These are the hearing aids:

siemensaquaris_battdoor_blk_4
Sexy beast! Bring on the beige, baby!

They are clearly way smaller and lighter than my backups – my ears are grateful for that. They have no volume control or adjustments; completely digital. I’m fine with that, and used to it too, since my Phonak’s operate the same way.

I am not even using the phone anymore – too stressful – so I have not tested them for bluetooth/T-coil capacity.

siemensaquaris_spec_blk_4Sound quality

It’s always a brain-bender to get used to a different sound system. The overall sound quality for the hearing aids is fine, it’s this strange sort of echo-y, tin-tastical-laced voiced sounds that kind of wanked me out. It’s like a dim, raspy-yet-clear- megaphone going straight into your ear canal. Does that make sense?

I think that the sound quality in Phonaks or non-waterproof Siemen’s models are better in terms of clarity.

The Water Part

  1. Swimming

I went swimming with Mack and Moxie and wore them – and it was WEIRD. It was actually not fun because I’m not used to hearing all that and it kind of freaked me out. The water sounds crinkly and metallic and rather than a lovely silence that goes with the feeling of water, it’s this jarring bunch of sound. And people in pools are NOISY – I didn’t know that (or like it).

So… the hearing aids work fine while swimming. But I won’t be doing that again unless I absolutely have to.

2. Showering

I took a shower with them in and it was just… ugh! How can hearing people stand to listen to shampoo like that? It’s TERRIBLE! That lathering sound is excruciating.

While the sounds of the actual shower were like nails on chalkboard to me, I liked being able to hear Moxie scream from the yurt (- or did I?), I liked the measure of safety that I felt being able to hear as I showered, but… I gotta be honest, I’m not doing it again. I much prefer my silent showers, so I’m not sure I’m going to be using them in the shower unless I absolutely have to.

Overall

I’m a few months in to using these hearing aids as my primary hearing devices. I love them because here in Humboldt County, it rains a lot and I am never nervous anymore about getting my hearing aids wet outside while walking or hiking. That’s an awesome feeling.

I also like them while on the beach or river, because again, no worries about water accidentally destroying them.

But I won’t go swimming or shower with them in unless I have no choice. I can’t stand the unfamiliar sounds and much prefer my silence.

While I do think that the sound quality in Phonaks or non-waterproof Siemens models are superior to the sound quality in these, these bubbas are waterproof. I’m not getting the best quality sound, but since I’m a pretty active mom of 3 very active kids living in one of the rainiest parts of California with a lifestyle that revolves around water, I’ll take it.

Note:

This post is not sponsored in any way, shape or form. I purchased the hearing aids through insurance and am only writing this review for other hear-wearers out there who might want to know about these. Questions? Please ask in the comments or message me. I’m happy to share more.

I want to make this really simple. This post is about travel, poop and having a child with special needs.

Do yourself a favor and don't read it if you don't have kids. Mm'kay? Just head on down the list of posts and read something else that might make more sense for you.

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One of the most common issues for kids with Down syndrome point blank is constipation. It's probably the most frequent question that pops up on all Down syndrome boards, spilling over into the general special needs community forums. Everyone has this issue with their kid(s), at one time or another. Everyone.

And then, when you travel, it's compounded. I don't know what it is, but something about a changed diet, a shift from routine? Whatever it is, not just my Moxie – who has Down syndrome – but typically developing Micah as well – have bowel issues.

I have long advocated for coconut oil, placed directly in food. It's easy, it tends to work well. Any oil, really, but pure, organic coconut oil or coconut butter worked really well for my child.

Probiotics are also magical. I feed my kids probiotic-rich yogurt nearly daily, but definitely a few times a week. It really helps.

But what to do when travelling? What do do when you are out on the road and can't find probiotic-rich yogurt, when it's just not feasible or possible to bring along the coconut butter?

Enter: Culturelle Kids!

This is what they are: a portable pill/powder (depending on your child's weight) that will help support digest and boosts overall digestive health and provides ongoing maintenance for a healthy digestive tract. In a nutshell: it helps your child poop well by releasing those priobiotics.

It's recommended by pediatriciants, trusted by parents.

For me, the main pieces were really that I knew that I had something with a solid reputation and track record on hand while travelling to keep the kids regular in lieu of their typical yogurt. Like I said, it's portable. It's super easy. You can just bring a box or two with you and that's that.

Share!

– Have you used Culturelle Kids? Did your little ones like it? (mine think it's candy…)

– What do you do to keep your child regular if you have problems? What's worked for you and yours?

 

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Disclaimer:  I was compensated for this post and provided with Culturelle samples.  All opinions provided are my own. Of course. I'd never fake something like this, involving our kids.

 

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