Movies

Able: A New Series About Disability in the Entertainment Industry on Amazon

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This is about Able, the new series regarding disability in the media on Amazon.

ABLE is a series of interviews between Kallen and Alie, the producers of the show, and actors with disabilities.

It is not a show itself, it’s not a sitcom, it’s not like Special or Speechless. It’s a series of short interviews about disability in the media, about becoming an actor or entertainer with a disability.

It’s about inclusion and access in the entertainment industry, it’s about representation.

Able Did Not Blow My Mind

I feel kind of mean saying that Able did not blow my mind, but I have to be honest: it didn’t.

Most of the stuff on there is really old news for me, and it wasn’t told in what (for me) would be a fresh way.  It did not give me any “a-ha!” moments.

But Able is Great for:
Newbie A-Ha’s

If you are fairly new to the world of disability though, it would give you tons of “a-ha!”, I know it would.

Maysoon Zayid’s alone would make you pop (God, but I love Maysoon Zayid!! Watch her TED Talk here)

Succinct soundbites for disability related presentations or trainings

Lots of people who read this blog give presentations on disability and need soundbites to put in presentations or trainings. Able is  full of those soundbites!

You would probably want to get a copy of the series through their site (links below) to have on hand. It will be really useful for a future training when you need clips of people with disabilities talking about us being the largest minority group in the world that anyone can join at any time (and so forth).

The fact that Able is on Amazon Prime did blow my mind.

This is not the kind of show that I expect to see on Amazon – it’s way too real for that, way too on-point and (dare I say?) unfashionable, not sexy. This is the type of series that I would expect to see at a conference on inclusion and access, not alongside Late Night or Sea Prince and the Fire Child.

Able: A Series on Disability in the Entertainment Industry, available through Amazon Prime

The fact that Amazon has it in their Prime lineup, and that the information in the series is so unerringly sharp, were what made me watch it and want to write about it. This is the kind of stuff that I want to support because it’s a start.

The best way to say, “more disability, please!” to Amazon (or any other corporation) is through views.

So let’s watch it!

Support this awesome endeavor, this bright start!

And remember my post about getting Prime on EBT/Medicaid, or as a Student or the free trial? This is a great way to get going with it, if you haven’t already.

More Information:

Be a FLUFFMEISTER!!!

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Meriah
Meriah Nichols is a career counselor, teacher and blogger. Single mom to 3 (one with Down syndrome, one gifted 2E), she is also a cat-loving Trekkie who likes her coffee hot and black.
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4 Comments

  1. I haven’t seen it but I will check it out. With that said, I believe a lot of these good shows (“Breathe” the biographical movie about polio activist Robin Cavendish did blow me away and I’m a polio survivor but I do forget a lot of my history) are often meant to speak to those outside the “choir” but watched more by people in the choir (us the end users). I have 60+ years of fighting the fight while still living my life. I look back on articles about access I wrote 30 years ago and they are as applicable today as they were then however I’ve come to realize I was writing for the choir and not our allies. It’s our allies (those that see but don’t live it everyday) that need to be more vocal. As long as it’s only me speaking out I’m a “special interest” but if my allies are speaking out it’s a community issue.

    • Absolutely. I completely agree with you.
      I want to watch “Breathe” now! I’m going to go and try and find it.

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