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9 Great Children’s Books About Down Syndrome

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This is a post about great children’s books about Down syndrome.

Children’s Books About Down Syndrome

Stories are a wonderful way to explain Down syndrome to a child,

Good children’s books find ways to convey the complexity – and simplicity – of Down syndrome, and they bring home the humanity of us all. I’ve personally enjoyed reading children’s books about Down syndrome to not only my sons (who do not have Down syndrome) but to my daughter (who does). It’s an easy way for her to understand her extra chromosome as well.

What’s Inside You Is Inside Me, Too: My Chromosomes Make Me Unique

“Every child, every person, every living thing is unique, in big part, due to chromosomes. Children with Down syndrome have an extra chromosome. this book informs people about Down syndrome in a fun illustrative way. In the process, it also explains chromosomes and their role in making every living thing special. A valuable tool for educators, siblings, individuals with Down syndrome, advocates and for those innately curious.”

My Friend Has Down Syndrome

From the “Let’s Talk About it Series

“The sensitively written Let’s Talk About It Books encourage preschool-age and early-grades children to explore their feelings, deal with problems that trouble them, and understand others who have problems of their own. …Here, in this reassuring story, two children, one with Down syndrome and one without, learn that they are both good at different things and that by helping each other overcome their fears and difficulties they can accomplish a great deal together.”

My Friend Has Down Syndrome

From the “Friends With Disabilities” Series

“My friend Sarah has a disability called Down Syndrome. But that doesn’t matter to us. We tell jokes and laugh, go to ballet class together, and have a lot of fun. I’m glad Sarah is my friend!”

We’ll Paint the Octopus Red

“As six-year-old Emma anticipates the birth of her new baby brother or sister, she vividly imagines all of the things they can do together. Emma feels ready to be a big sister! Then when the baby is born, her dad tells her that it’s a boy and he has something called Down syndrome. Finally she asks, “If Isaac has this Down thing, then what can’t he do?”. Her dad thinks about it, then tells her that as long as they are patient with him, and help him when he needs it, there probably isn’t anything Isaac can’t do. In this touching story, Emma helps her father as much as he helps her to realise that Isaac is the baby they dreamed of. The book concludes with a set of commonly asked questions about Down syndrome with answers for children and how it might affect their sibling and family. For ages 3-7.”

Down on the Farm

“A beautiful story highlighting a sunny day visit to the farm. The reader is invited into a whimsical tale with animals and children enjoying their adventures. What makes this story unique, however, is that each of the children photographed in the book has Down Syndrome. The storyline is appropriate for all children and clearly shows the abilities of children with an extra chromosome.”

You’re All Kinds of Wonderful

“We’re not all the same. Thank goodness we’re not.
Life would be boring, and I mean… a lot.

And so, when we’re born, we’re supplied at the start
with our own bells and whistles to set us apart.

Think of your bells as the things you do best
things tucked away in your own treasure chest.

Part of growing up is discovering―and embracing―what makes us unique. From different abilities to different personalities, we are all wonderfully made with our own bells and whistles.

Once again, New York Times-bestselling author and artist Nancy Tillman takes a universal truth and makes it accessible for readers young and old.”

My Friend Isabelle

“(2004 iParenting Media Award Winner) Isabelle and Charlie are friends. They both like to draw, dance, read, and play at the park. They both like to eat Cheerios. They both cry if their feelings are hurt. And, like most friends, they are also different from each other. Isabelle has Down syndrome. Charlie doesn’t. Written by Isabelle’s mother, this charming tale encourages readers to think about what makes a friendship special. MY FRIEND ISABELLE also opens the door for young children to talk about differences and the world around them. It’s a wonderful story to read at bedtime or to share at school. Lively full color illustrations dovetail beautifully with the text to bring the simple story to life.”

Kids Like Me…Learn ABC’s

Kids Like Me…Learn ABCs includes appealing photos of children with Down syndrome on a crisp white background, surrounded by colorful borders. Each child holds or interacts with an object that represents a letter of the alphabet. Surrounding images also show that letter in sign language, upper and lower case type, and an illustration of the featured object.

All children will enjoy this book, but children with Down syndrome will delight in seeing other kids just like them, having fun and learning about their ABCs..”

Kids Like Me… Learn Colors

Kids Like Me…Learn Colors teaches primary colors, plus orange, green, purple, pink, brown, black, white, silver, gold, gray, and a multi-color rainbow. Every page features a child with Down syndrome wearing a shirt and playing with an object of the same color, photographed against a crisp, white background. Borders contain the word for English and Spanish. After all, it’s never too early to start bilingual education!”

I hope this collection of the great children’s books about Down syndrome has been useful.

Please remember to not let cost deter you from reading what is useful: ask your local library to stock up on these titles if they don’t carry them, make sure your local Down syndrome association or group carries them. Recommend them to your child’s school too!

For more information and to connect with other parents, don’t forget to read my:

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Meriah
Meriah Nichols is a career counselor, teacher and blogger. Single mom to 3 (one with Down syndrome, one gifted 2E), she is also a Trekkie who likes her coffee hot and black.
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